Breast In Nature? Breast Shaped Hills

Have you ever gone sightseeing and noticed a peculiar shape off in the hills? Maybe it’s just that the sky has always inspired the imagination of all mankind, but we always seem to spend more time discussing the shapes in the clouds than we do discuss the shapes on land. That’s too bad because we might otherwise be having a lot of fun! Geographical features in the shape of a breast can be found anywhere and everywhere, and are often code-named “Pap.” If you’re on the lookout for these fun distraction attractions, you might want to visit these best breast-shaped locations.

Canada has much to offer by way of adventure, and you’d be hard-pressed not to find some at Squaw’s Tit, a landmark near Canmore, Alberta just outside of the Canadian Rockies in the same region. This is the politically incorrect name, of course, but those are always so much more fun than the real ones. You won’t have any trouble finding it, either. There are some decent hiking opportunities to be had here.

If you’re a fan of the Adirondack Mountains in New York, then don’t forget to head on over to Nippletop. You’ll find it in Essex County in the Colvin Range, near Dial Mountain.

Apparently, Utah has a number of similar landmarks, all called Mollie’s Nipple. Although some sources say there are at least eleven of them, only seven are listed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Nipples located in Kane County, Hurricane Valley, and Bear River Gorge are perhaps more noteworthy than the others, and some nipples can be ascended.

A pair of twin hills in Venezuela fetch a rather pleasurable viewing experience. They’re called the Tetas de Maria Guevara, and local fishermen use them as a landmark for finding their way. The surrounding areas are flat and arid, making them stand out all the more. There’s even an accompanying legend: a woman named Maria Guevara breastfed soldiers who fought in the Venezuelan War of Independence. According to the story, she even breastfed her adult sons–and made them into fierce warriors. Her tomb is apparently beneath the twin hilltops.

You may have heard of the Twin Peaks in San Francisco, California. Spanish settlers of the region in the 1700s had already decided on the name “Los Pechos de la Chola” which means “Breasts of the Indian Maiden.” Naturally, the Americans decided to rename it. Although the uppermost parts of the peaks are not developed, you’ll find a fairly big natural preserve. A tunnel runs underneath the peaks.

If you cruise on over to Puerto Rico, you might want to catch a glimpse of the Cerro Las Tetas (or Las Tetas de Cayey) in Salinas. The peaks are a protected natural preserve, and you can most easily view them from the Puerto Rico Highway 52.